Edit ModuleShow Tags

1,200 Endangered Frogs Released into the Wild



Ryan Hawk / Woodland Park Zoo

It took a military base, three zoos and a corrections center to pull it off, but yesterday 1,200 of the endanged Oregon spotted tree frog were released into a protected area in Washington to help the native species recover.

The Oregon spotted frog population in Washington has dropped by an estimated 80 to 90 percent, and the frogs were declared endanged by the state in 1997. The collaborative recovery project began in 2007.

Ryan Hawk / Woodland Park Zoo

More than 1,200 endangered Oregon spotted frogs were released yesterday at a protected site to help restore their populations.

The endangered frogs were collected from wetlands as eggs by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists and placed at Woodland Park Zoo, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, Oregon Zoo, and Cedar Creek Corrections Center for hatching and rearing for several months in a predator-free home as they transform at metamorphosis – from tadpole to full-fledged frog – giving them a "head start" until they are large enough to avoid some predators that might eat them.

Through a partnership with Joint Base Lewis-McChord, the frogs were then released in the Dailman Lake area at Fort Lewis. The protected site contains one of the largest relatively intact wetlands remaining in the Puget Lowlands. "It is suitable for reintroduction because its diverse wetlands are connected to a stream system that can sustain a frog population," said Jim Lynch, wildlife biologist at JBLM.

The frog reintroduction program is a five-year collaborative effort among Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, Woodland Park Zoo, Oregon Zoo, Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, Washington State Department of Corrections, Washington State Department of Transportation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Port Blakely Tree Farms, Washington Department of Natural Resources, U.S Geological Survey, Mountain View Conservation & Breeding Centre and The Nature Conservancy.

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module

Family Events Calendar

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags