Edit ModuleShow Tags

Five Fabulous Travel Blogs



You want to travel, not try to navigate the wide world of family travel blogs. That's why we pulled our Seattle's Child editors together to pick a few great ones. Some are from Seattle-area writers, others from further afield. But all offer real, well-written reviews of places and products, great tips on traveling easily and safely with kids, and, of course, inspiration to get you traveling.

Delicious Baby: "Making Travel with Kids Fun"

www.deliciousbaby.com

Debbie Dubrow, a Seattle mom of three, has created a hugely popular blog by combining an easy-to-navigate interface with scores of clearly written, informative posts. It includes detailed guides for many major U.S. and European cities, tips sorted by category, and must-have travel products like waterproof paper for emergency information and compression sacks for laundry. Get motivated by photos (like the kid's-eye-view of the Eiffel Tower), keep comfortable with essential information, such as Madrid's emergency phone numbers, and save your sanity with tips, like how to get baby food through customs. Or stay close to home as Dubrow lovingly chronicles her favorite spots in and around Seattle.

Travels with Baby: "The Best Adventures with Your Child begin Here"

www.travelswithbaby.com

Also an award-winning book, Travels with Baby includes destination information worldwide. In many cases, author Shelly Rivoli interviews moms who live in destination cities, asking about fundamentals from car seat laws to breastfeeding customs to fun activities (historic carousels in Buenos Aires parks, anyone?). The site includes many lists, from a hotel babysitter directory to an Amazon.com compilation of must-have products, and offers quick answers to reader questions.

Pit Stops for Kids

www.pitstopsforkids.com

With a unique feature that lets you select an interstate highway to find the best places to stop along it, this blog is the perfect companion to your U.S. road trip. International destinations (including a rundown of play spaces in airports) are also included. The sheer volume of information makes this blog well worth the visit, but if you want to leave the trip planning to the experts, just click on the "road trips" section of this Oregon-based blog and author Amy Whitley will provide kid-tested journeys that vary from one to 22 days. Don't miss the lovely essays that remind you why you're traveling in the first place.

WanderMom: "Inspiration for Where to Travel with Children"

www.wandermom.com

Clearly Seattle blogger Michelle Duffy means it when she says she wants to inspire "fearless travel." Duffy and her family backpacked for a year in 2010, visiting 26 countries on four continents, including Iraq and Zambia. The blog reflects the breadth and awe of their experience with interesting, candid photos as well as entertaining and philosophical writings. Duffy's tips are geared toward international travel, including how to minimize the stress of flying with infants and small children. Though sometimes hard to navigate, the blog is packed with gems: her kids' hilarious trip-planning quips, a culture-transcending moment between Duffy and a Syrian mom in a refugee camp.

Hip Travel Mama: "A Well-traveled Family Never Goes out of Style"

www.hiptravelmama.com

If you're into tent camping or youth hostels, this blog might not be for you. But if you love ocean cruises and luxury apartment rentals in Paris, (and, well, who would turn that down?) read on. Seattle blogger Anne Taylor Hartzell reviews spas and four-star hotels, emphasizing how travel can help families to be more connected and culturally aware. She is a spokeswoman for several higher-end brands, and the disclosures about where her family has been for free might incite a bit of envy. But the section that will likely reach the widest audience is Hartzell's review of Disney resorts on both coasts (and the company's cruises).

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Content

What Happens When Your Child is the Oldest or Youngest in Their Kindergarten Class?

To start kindergarten in Washington, a child must turn 5 by midnight of August 31st of that year – or at least that’s how it used to be.

Arguing in a wetsuit

If I’ve learned nothing else from the past 7½ years of single parenting, it’s that life is made up of the small, ordinary things that are easy to miss.

Hitting the Ski Trails with Baby in Tow

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module

Family Events Calendar

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags