Seattle's Child

Your guide to a kid-friendly city

Get in Shape for Family-Friendly “Scare Climb!”

Parents who want to combine some unique Halloween fun with a healthy message about exercise, healthy lifestyles and smoking prevention should get ready to bring their costumed youngsters to Two Union Square in downtown Seattle on Sunday, Oct. 28, to participate in the American Lung Association's "Kids' Scare Climb."

This is the first year for the Scare Climb, a family-friendly mini-event coordinating with the larger Fight for Air Climb, in which adults attempt to climb all 51 floors of the Two Union Square building. Youngsters will have the option of climbing all stairs as well, but those who want to do the eight-floor only "Scare Climb" in costumes can enjoy Halloween-themed activities and treats (vampire's blood water stops, for example). Big Tobacco will be there, too, to provide a "scary" reminder of why kids should never use tobacco products.

This is the third year the American Lung Association has hosted a stair climb in Seattle, which is similar to stair climbs held in 60 other cities around the nation. Renee Klein, president and CEO of the American Lung Association of the Mountain Pacific, says it seems natural to create a youth-focused climb with a Halloween theme, since the event is the last Sunday before Halloween.

"Last year we had many children and youth climb stairs with their parents or guardians, so we are really excited about tying this to Halloween," she said. "There will be awards for best costumes, activities like coloring and face painting, and lung-related contests like whistling and balloon blowing. Mom and dad can take home information on healthy homes, asthma management, radon and other topics."

The website www.climbseattle.org is open for registration. The fee for those doing the Scare Climb only is just $10 (per adult and maximum of two kids). For adults and youth who want to do the full stair climb, registration is $40 and they must fundraise or donate $100. For those doing the regular stair climb plus the Scare Climb, the fee is $45, providing a reduced rate for doing both events.

"Each year, too many lives are impacted by lung disease and this is a chance to climb, raise money and make an impact in their honor," said Klein. "Whether you climb in honor of a loved one you lost to smoking, or because you have a child with asthma, by joining the Seattle 2012 Fight for Air Climb or the Kids' Scare Climb you are helping fight lung disease so that everyone can breathe easier."

Eighty-one cents of every dollar raised goes directly to education, research and advocacy. For more information about the event, visit www.climbseattle.org or call Joe Dann at 206-512-5281.

About the Author