Seattle's Child

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#thankfulthursday Northwest Harvest food bank

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#ThankfulThursday: Northwest Harvest needs volunteers — and kids can help, too

Children as young as 9 can participate.

#ThankfulThursday: Anyone who is 9 years old and up is eligible to help out at Northwest Harvest. There is food sorting and repackaging to be done at the warehouses in Kent, Yakima and Spokane, and children can also assist at the SODO Community Market in Seattle. Individuals can sign up, as can groups

Families can donate by giving once or monthly. You can find the online donation form here.

According to the Northwest Harvest website: “1 in 6 Washington kids live in a household that faces challenges in putting enough food on the table.” 

And if you want to donate food directly, Northwest Harvest has tips for would-be food donors: “Host a virtual food drive, contact your local food bank to see if they are accepting food donations, start a ‘little free pantry,’ or donate to a mutual aid campaign.”

(Northwest Harvest’s non-virtual food drive programs have been suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic.) 

Here are public food-drop sites for nonperishable food suggested by Northwest Harvest. (Donation receipts cannot be provided.) 

| A neighborhood starts mutual aid stations during COVID crisis |

Northwest Harvest partners with these food banks throughout the state.

To learn more about the organization’s movement to work toward food justice in Washington, go to northwestharvest.org/our-work/food-justice/.

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About the Author

Jillian O'Connor

Jillian O’Connor is managing editor of the Seattle's Child print magazine. She lives in Seattle with her husband, two sons and a dog named after the Loch Ness Monster.